A Sulfur Anthology: Clayton Eshleman, ed.

Clayton Eshleman started his first magazine, Caterpillar, in New York City in the fall of 1967 — the very same moment I moved from Europe to the US. It wasn’t until some time in late 1968 that the magazine was brought to my attention, either by Robert Kelly, with whom I was working on Paul Celan translations at Bard College, or by Thomas Meyer, a student like me at … Read more A Sulfur Anthology: Clayton Eshleman, ed.

YOKO TAWADA: CELAN READS JAPANESE

from: The White Review: A fascinating reflection on Celan and translation from Yōko Tawada, a Japanese writer currently living in Berlin, Germany who writes in both Japanese and German. I missed the piece when it first cam out in 2013, but very happy to have come across it now. Opening paras below, then click on “here.” THERE ARE SOME WHO CLAIM THAT ‘GOOD’ LITERATURE IS ACTUALLY untranslatable.  Before I could read … Read more YOKO TAWADA: CELAN READS JAPANESE

Abdelwahab Meddeb: The Malady of Islam (9)

The Malady of Islam by Abdelwahab Meddeb translated from the French by Pierre Joris and Charlotte Mandell (9th installment) P A R T III Fundamentalism Against the West 19 Islam never had a Dante who summoned the intellectual audacity to make his writing address political events as they appeared in the reality of history.  I dream of this genius that Islam did not create:  he would have constituted the opposite … Read more Abdelwahab Meddeb: The Malady of Islam (9)

Ken Irby @ 78!

Yesterday was Ken Irby’s 78th birthday, and I’m extremely happy to announce that the Jacket2 special feature (edited by Kyle Waugh & Billy Joe Harris) is now live. Happy Birthday, Ken! This feature devoted to the work of Kenneth Irby collects a number of papers delivered at the 2011 colloquium devoted to Irby in Lawrence, Kansas, along with new essays by Robert Bertholf, Dale Smith, Matthew Hofer, and others; a chronology, a poem … Read more Ken Irby @ 78!

Abdelwahab Meddeb (1946-2014)

Abdelwahab Meddeb passed away in the night from Wednesday to Thursday in Paris.  Born in Tunis in 1946, he was a poet, scholar, writer, translator, traveller, magazine editor (“Dédale“), book editor (as series editor with  Editions Sindbad from 1974 to 1987 he published the classics of sufism as well as many of the most outstanding contemporary Arab authors), radio producer (check out his France Culture broadcasts Cultures d’Islam which he did weekly for 17 years) & … Read more Abdelwahab Meddeb (1946-2014)

Khaled Mattawa on Mahmood Darwish

Via Electronic Intifada: An accessible look at Darwish’s life and work, at long last Sarah Irving The Electronic Intifada 1 July 2014 Mahmoud Darwish(APA images) It is hard to talk about modern Palestinian culture without mentioning Mahmoud Darwish. The late Palestinian “poet laureate,” one of the greatest poets writing in Arabic in the twentieth century, Darwish’s brilliance looms large, six years after his death. It is surprising, then, that until … Read more Khaled Mattawa on Mahmood Darwish

New Issue of Hyperion: Musil, Carmelo Bene, Emilio Villa & More!

A superb issue of a magnificently eclectic magazine, just out! Volume VIII, No. 1 (spring 2014) This issue of Hyperion is dedicated to Louis le Brocquy (1916–2012) Complete Issue PDF [forthcoming soon] Also available on issuu.com [forthcoming soon] Cover PDF Mast Head PDF Table of Contents PDF Thought… to the Purpose PDF Nicholas Birns, Reenchantment is not Enough: Gosetti-Ferencei’s Post-Heideggerian Heidegger PDF Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei, A New Poetics of Dasein PDF Carmelo … Read more New Issue of Hyperion: Musil, Carmelo Bene, Emilio Villa & More!

On UK lyric, anti-lyric, and political poetry.

Peter Riley is a poet & commentator whose work I follow with much pleasure & gain. His latest column for the Fortnightly Review is available HERE & here is how Peter describes it: It concerns poets pulled or self-propelled part-way or more towards the “advanced poetry” climate in UK, especially its ex-Cambridge (anti-lyric) flavour, set against a poet from quite elsewhere who by cultivating the history of an interceding … Read more On UK lyric, anti-lyric, and political poetry.