Samira Negrouche’s ‘Seven Little Jasmine Monologues’

Etel Adnan at Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg. From eteladnan.com. Thanks to Arabic Literature (in English) & via MLYNXQUALEY on JULY 11, 2017 , these works by my good friend Samia Negrouche: The poem “Seven Little Jasmine Monologues” first appeared in Pleaides magazine, in Marilyn Hacker’s translation, and is reprinted here with permission:  The poem posted below, according to Negrouche, “happened when a trip to Cairo had The poem posted below, according to Negrouche, “happened when a … Read more Samira Negrouche’s ‘Seven Little Jasmine Monologues’

Nabile Farès (1940-2016)

Just heard from his close friend, the poet Habib Tengour, that the great Algerian writer Nabile Farès died on Wednesday. A brief bio-note (revising the Wikipedia entry) for those who don’t know Farès or his work, followed by a little essay I wrote some years ago: Born in Collo, Algeria, Nabile Farès participated, during the Liberation war, in the strikes of the high school students in 1956, before joining the ranks of the National … Read more Nabile Farès (1940-2016)

2015 in Algerian Literature: Five to Watch

via Arabic Literature (in English) &Y MLYNXQUALEY on DECEMBER 25, 2015 • ( 0 ) Algerian literature was celebrated regionally and globally in 2015. But beyond the surface of the big names — the Kamel Daouds, Boualem Sansals and Yasmina Khadras — what else was going on? Nadia Ghanem looks back: By Nadia Ghanem Algerian literature this year has been marked by familiar names within and outside our borders. … Read more 2015 in Algerian Literature: Five to Watch

Assia Djebar (1936-2015)

Very sad to learn of Assia Djebar‘s passing: she was an amazing woman & a superb writer! Her novel Fantasia: An Algerian Cavalcade can stand with Kateb Yacine’s Nedjma as foundational text for Algerian post-colonial literature. In Poems for the Millennium vol.4 I published some of her work, including a poem I reprinted here on Nomadics a while back (“Poems for a Happy Algeria”). Below, a first obit by mlynxqualey via Arabic Literature(in English): … Read more Assia Djebar (1936-2015)

Madeleine Campbell’s “Jetties”

via Arab Literature (in English): ‘Jetties’: Translating Mohammed Dib Through ‘Sound, Gesture, Movement and Sculpture’ by mlynxqualey Madeleine Campbell is the force behind the public engagement project Jetties, designed to stage the poetry of Algerian author Mohammed Dib (1920-2003) in contemporary frames and contexts. Campbell answered a few questions about Dib, translation, which of his books should compete in the World Cup of Lit, and her project: ArabLit: How did Jetties start? … Read more Madeleine Campbell’s “Jetties”

Interview on Maghreb Anthology in “Africa Is A Country”

The Book of North African Literature: Pierre Joris on Poetry and Miscegenation. By Orlando Reade. December 5 2013. A 743-page anthology of North African literature was published by the University of California last year. Ranging from documents made in sixth century Carthage to experimental prose published months after the 2011 uprisings, the Book of North African Literature is the fourth installment in the Poems for the Millenium, a series initiated in 1995 by Pierre … Read more Interview on Maghreb Anthology in “Africa Is A Country”

Tears of the Crocodile

Below, the opening paras of Regina Keil-Sagawe’s excellent interview with Algerian novelist Yasmina Khadra in Qantara magazine; you can read the full interview here. “There Is a Life after Defeat” Now based in France, the Algerian writer Yasmina Khadra is one of his country’s most successful authors. The film The Attack, based on Yasmina Khadra’s book of the same name, was honoured as Best International Literary Adaptation at this … Read more Tears of the Crocodile

A “Nobelisable” Djebar?

M. Lynx Qualey has an interesting post on her Arabic Literature (in English) blog, which I am reposting below. It is quite true that Assia Djebar would have been a much more interesting choice (among many possibles — I still think Adonis should have gotten the Nobel years ago). Her work as a novelist, essayist, poet & filmmaker is breathtaking in its scope, formal inventiveness, historical sweep, psychological savvyness, … Read more A “Nobelisable” Djebar?