Charles Bernstein: Outside of Tune, Inside of Time

Charles Bernstein’s response / closing talk at the Outside-in / Inside-out conference in Glasgow this past October. Inspired by the recently published fifth volume of Poems for the Millennium, Barbaric Vast & Wild: A Gathering of Outside & Subterranean Poetry from Origins to Present, edited by Jerome Rothenberg & John Bloomberg-Rissman, this festival and symposium opened up views to poetry past, present, and potentially future with the question: Is … Read more Charles Bernstein: Outside of Tune, Inside of Time

Homage to Mohammed Bennis

This weekend I will travel to Asilah, Morocco, to take part on coming Tuesday in a day of homage for the great arabophone poet Mohammed Bennis, in the context of the 38th International Cultural Moussem at Al Moutamid Ibn Abbad Summer University, in the company of Adonis, Bernard Noël, Joachim Sartorius & a number of other poets & critics. Here, the detailed schedule: Programme Hommage au poète Mohammed Bennis 38ème Moussem culturel international d’Asilah … Read more Homage to Mohammed Bennis

Happy Birthday, Jack Kerouac!

Possibly my single favorite piece of writing by Ti’Jean (March 12, 1922, Lowell, MA — October 21, 1969, St. Petersburg, FL): October in the Railroad Earth — given as poem by Youtube, in fact a prose piece, though its absolute beauty is exactly its genre-defying swing — writing at its most superb, writing to be listened to. Enjoy!

Stephen Kessler on Juan Felipe Herrera

This article was first published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel two days ago. America’s new ‘bard without borders’ Juan Felipe Herrera, California’s poet laureate, the son of migrant farmworkers, will be the next U.S. poet in chief. Riverside Press-Enterprise file By Stephen Kessler, Special to the Sentinel Juan Felipe Herrera, child of Mexican-American migrant workers, schooled at UCLA and Stanford, native Californian and outgoing state poet laureate, frequent visitor to … Read more Stephen Kessler on Juan Felipe Herrera

Happy 80th, Jürgen Ploog!

Jürgen Ploog, maybe the best & most adventurous of the German cut-up & collage writers — with Carl Weissner (1940-2012) — turned 80 on Friday. For 33 years a long-distance pilot for Lufthansa (I remember a photo of him with typewriter in cockpit), he has been a cosmonaut of inner & outer space for even longer and his books, from Cola Hinterland (1969) to Unterwegssein ist alles (2011) have been consistent mappings of mental, sexual, cultural … Read more Happy 80th, Jürgen Ploog!

Should You Travel Through Luxembourg This Summer or Fall…

Madame Maggy Nagel, Ministre de la Culture et Monsieur Claude D. Conter, Directeur du Centre national de littérature ont le plaisir de vous inviter au vernissage de l’exposition PRENDRE le LARGE qui aura lieu le mercredi 14 mai 2014 à 19h30 au Centre national de littérature à Mersch. L’exposition est ouverte au public du jeudi 15 mai au samedi 25 octobre 2014 du lundi au vendredi de 10 à 17 … Read more Should You Travel Through Luxembourg This Summer or Fall…

Etel Adnan Named ‘Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres’

Very happy to hear that Etel Adnan, a gerat writer & good friend, was thus honored by the French. Marcy Qualey just posted the info on her Arab Literature (in English) blog, which I am copying here: Lebanese writer and painter Etel Adnan has been named a Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government, a distinction she shares with artists as varied as Terry Gilliam, Shakira, Tim Burton, … Read more Etel Adnan Named ‘Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres’

75 Years Ago Osip Mandelstam died

Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam — О́сип Эми́льевич Мандельшта́м — was born January 15  1891 & died 75 years ago today on December 27, 1938 in Siberia at a transit camp to the Gulag where Stalin had sent him for writing poems that insulted the dictator. Probably the greatest Russian lyric poet & essayist of the first part of the 20C. I am still awaiting a really great translation into English of the poetry. Many … Read more 75 Years Ago Osip Mandelstam died

“Meridian” Translation awarded Scaglione Prize

Here’s what the jury had to say about their choice: Paul Celan’s The Meridian was originally delivered as an acceptance speech to the German Academy for Language and Poetry, which had honored him in 1960 with its Georg Büchner Prize for Literature. It ranks as its author’s most powerful statement concerning the mysterious but powerful bond between poetry and life. Writing in the shadow of the Holocaust, Celan asks … Read more “Meridian” Translation awarded Scaglione Prize