de Bottoning Out

…& as we’re on religion, here’s a follow-up that has nothing to do with Karl or Jesus. It is a critical take on Alain de Botton’s proposal for a “temple for atheists” in his latest book Religion for Atheists by Caspar Melville writing in the New Humanist. Christopher Hitchens, where are you now that we need you! Opening paras below: Caspar Melville Portrait of Alain de Botton by John Reynolds … Read more de Bottoning Out

A Change of Underwear

News from Trier, Germany, home of a major Catholic Cathedral & birthplace of Karl Marx: From 13 April to 13 May a highly publicized mise-en-scene by the catholic church will propose a pilgrimage to the “Holy Dress,” a historically dubious piece of vestment (see below) the church claims to be Jesus’ own, that will be on show in the cathedral. To counter this piece of middle age metaphysical propaganda, … Read more A Change of Underwear

Oops!

Nomadics was hacked by some Kanadadaian Viagra/Cialis pharmacies on Monday — as I was in Albany teaching that day & Wednesday & not getting back ’cause of snow storm until yesterday afternoon, I only got to the problem today. Didn’t manage to solve it myself — but Nicole did! & so now I’ll be trying to catch up. Meanwhile, here are the cacti of the Narrows Botanical Garden under … Read more Oops!

The End of the World Happened 100 Years Ago…

… when Jakob von Hoddis published  maybe his best known poem — & maybe the opening shot of Expressionism? — titled “Weltende,” “End of the World” —in the German paper Der Demokrat (well, he did so in three days, on 11 January, to be precise, so we can breathe easy until Tuesday): Weltende Dem Bürger fliegt vom spitzen Kopf der Hut, in allen Lüften hallt es wie Geschrei. Dachdecker … Read more The End of the World Happened 100 Years Ago…

More Summer Noticings…

— Prehistoric Dildo, as reported by LiveScience where Clara Moskowitz writes: “The carved bone was unearthed at a Mesolithic site in Motala, Sweden, that is rich with ancient artifacts from between 4,000 to 6,000 B.C. The area’s unique features may have allowed bone artifacts, which usually get destroyed over the millennia, to survive. ‘It’s an organic object, that’s why it’s special,’ Gruber told LiveScience. ‘Normally when we excavate early … Read more More Summer Noticings…