On Mahmoud Darwish’s Birthday, 13 Poems

via Arab Lit (in English) & the indefatigable Marcia Lynx Qualey: The Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish (d. 2008) was born in al-Birwa on this day in 1941. To commemorate his entrance into our world on March 13, ArabLit has 13 poems (and poemish texts): 1) “The Moon Did Not Fall Into the Well,” from Journal of an Ordinary Grief, tr. Ibrahim Muhawi Muhawi’s translations have a wonderful sense of the rhythm … Read more On Mahmoud Darwish’s Birthday, 13 Poems

Khalid Lyamlahy’s Review of “Canto Diurno”

  Dans son avant-dire, le poète américain Charles Bernstein note que la poésie de Pierre Joris « renverse les hiérarchies, mais sans omettre de soigner, de tendre, de remuer, de labourer, de fermenter et de fomenter » (p. 6). Dans cette anthologie personnelle qui reprend une sélection de son œuvre depuis les années 1970, le lecteur ne peut que constater l’énergie débordante de l’écriture de Joris. Cette énergie se traduit d’abord … Read more Khalid Lyamlahy’s Review of “Canto Diurno”

Gerrit Lansing (February 25, 1928-February 11, 2018)

Gerrit Lansing, poet, scholar, friend, passed away peacefully this past night. A man of wider & deeper knowledge than almost anyone I have known, Gerrit was as familiar with, and brought as much care to contemporary poetry & poetics than to older literatures, to the traditionary sciences than to modern science, to the making of music than to the preparing of food. A conversationalist sans pareil, he moved with grace, … Read more Gerrit Lansing (February 25, 1928-February 11, 2018)

AGADIR: Installation by Yto Barrada & texts by Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine

Today is the opening of Moroccan artist Yto Barrada’s installation AGADIR at the Curve Gallery of the Barbican Center in London. Below, the official announcement & a few of the pages from Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine’s book “Agadir,” which I translated for the occasion: For her first major London commission, artist Yto Barrada weaves together personal narratives and political ideals to create a complex portrait of a city and its people … Read more AGADIR: Installation by Yto Barrada & texts by Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine

Adios Avenidas: Poetry as Sexual Aggression?

The question: can a poem be a sexual aggression? Or more precisely: can this, the above poem, by Swiss-Bolivian poet Eugen Gomringer be seen as a sexually aggressive poem & therefore condemned to be removed from the Berlin high school — the Alice-Salomon-Hochschule — where it has adorned a side-wall for a few years now? Here’s the poem in my English translation: avenues avenues & flowers flowers flowers & women … Read more Adios Avenidas: Poetry as Sexual Aggression?

Syrian Kurdish Poet Golan Haji: ‘It’s Not Easy To Go for What One Loves

Via Arabaic Literature (in Translation) & BY MLYNXQUALEY on JANUARY 9, 2018 • ( 1 ) Syrian Kurdish poet Golan Haji, whose A Tree Whose Name I Don’t Know appeared in English last year, co-translated by the author and Stephen Watts, here shares an interview he did in response to questions by the Italian poet Luigia Sorrentino and the Iranian poet Azita Ghahreman:Haji is a poet and translator with a postgraduate degree … Read more Syrian Kurdish Poet Golan Haji: ‘It’s Not Easy To Go for What One Loves

Today, on the 70th Anniversary of Kurt Schwitter’s Death…

… he is ever so alive! Below, a little piece by Kurtchen translated by Jerome Rothenberg & myself from our book pppppp (still available from amazon or exact change) THE GREAT ARDOR OF DADA   A Funeral March Ardor bleeds Ardors bleed blood.. Merz greening tempest, charge at the clocks. The churchtower rises a pervert clawing of claws (it goes without saying). Claws on top claws, pervert, claws; smackeroo.  Blamm. … Read more Today, on the 70th Anniversary of Kurt Schwitter’s Death…

Two Texts by Clayton Eshleman: (2) Orphic Ontologies II

  Orphic Ontologies II The essence of human power: access to the cosmos from the heavens down to earth & into the Cro-Magnon underworld Charles Olson on Wallace Stevens. to Creeley, May 5, 1952: “For the lie in Stevens, however much the pleasure in the play of words, is his language, that, it is without rhythm because it is without passion which is person (not personae, that further divide … Read more Two Texts by Clayton Eshleman: (2) Orphic Ontologies II